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Trump Attacked McConnell on Russia Probe: NYT

Trump Attacked McConnell on Russia Probe: NYTRachel Maddow shares a new report from the New York Times about the strained relationship between Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell and notes that the intensifying Trump Russia investigation may be wearing on Trump.



Louise Linton, wife of Treasury Secretary Mnuchin, apologizes for nasty Instagram spat

Louise Linton, wife of Treasury Secretary Mnuchin, apologizes for nasty Instagram spatLouise Linton, the 36-year-old Scottish actress newly wedded to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, sparked a national kerfuffle Monday when she got into a spat with one of her Instagram followers.



Suspect says imam planned to blow himself up in Barcelona

Suspect says imam planned to blow himself up in BarcelonaMADRID (AP) ? An extremist cell was preparing bombs for an imam who planned to blow himself up at a Barcelona monument, a key suspect in the attacks that killed 15 people in northeastern Spain told a judge Tuesday, according to a judicial official.



U.S. Navy says remains found by Malaysia not of a USS McCain sailor

U.S. Navy says remains found by Malaysia not of a USS McCain sailorThe U.S. Navy said on Thursday human remains found by Malaysia were not one of its 10 sailors missing after a collision between one of its guided-missile destroyers and a merchant vessel east of Singapore this week. Medical examination of the remains, which the Malaysian navy discovered about eight nautical miles northwest of where the USS John S. McCain and a merchant vessel collided on Monday, confirmed it was not one of the 10 sailors, the U.S. Seventh Fleet said in a statement.



New ISIS Video Shows American Child For The First Time

New ISIS Video Shows American Child For The First TimeThe child says his father was a U.S. soldier who fought against jihadists in Iraq.



Mystery deaths of HL Hunley submarine crew solved - they accidentally killed themselves

Mystery deaths of HL Hunley submarine crew solved - they accidentally killed themselvesThe mystery of how the crew of one of the world?s first submarines died has finally been solved - they accidentally killed themselves. The HL Hunley sank on February 17 1864 after torpedoing the USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbour, South Carolina, during American Civil War. She was one of the first submarines ever to be used in conflict, and the first to sink a battleship. It was assumed the blast had ruptured the sub, drowning its occupants, but when the Hunley was raised in 2000, salvage experts were amazed to find the eight-man crew poised as if they had been caught completely unawares by the tragedy. All were still sitting in their posts and there was no evidence that they had attempted to flee the foundering vessel. The submarine being raised in 2000 Credit: US Navy Now researchers at Duke University believe they have the answer. Three years of experiments on a mini-test sub have shown that the torpedo blast would have created a shockwave great enough to instantly rupture the blood vessels in the lungs and brains of the submariners. "This is the characteristic trauma of blast victims, they call it 'blast lung,'" Dr Rachel Lance. ?You have an instant fatality that leaves no marks on the skeletal remains. Unfortunately, the soft tissues that would show us what happened have decomposed in the past hundred years.? The Hunley's torpedo was not a self-propelled bomb, but a copper keg of 135 pounds of gunpowder held ahead and slightly below the Hunley's bow on a 16-foot pole called a spar The sub rammed this spar into the enemy ship's hull and the bomb exploded. The furthest any of the crew was from the blast was about 42 feet. The shockwave of the blast travelled about 1500 meters per second in water, and 340 m/sec in air, the researchers calculate. The bodies of the crew were found sitting in their positions around the central crankshaft which made the submarine move  Credit: Reuters While a normal blast shockwave travelling in air should last less than 10 milliseconds, Lance calculated that the Hunley crew's lungs were subjected to 60 milliseconds or more of trauma. "That creates kind of a worst case scenario for the lungs," added Dr Lance. ?Shear forces would tear apart the delicate structures where the blood supply meets the air supply, filling the lungs with blood and killing the crew instantly. ?It's likely they also suffered traumatic brain injuries from being so close to such a large blast. "All the physical evidence points to the crew taking absolutely no action in response to a flood or loss of air. If anyone had survived, they may have tried to release the keel ballast weights, set the bilge pumps to pump water, or tried to get out the hatches, but none of these actions were taken.? A painting of the HL Hunley  Credit: Conrad Wise Chapman The fate of the crew of the 40-foot Hunley remained a mystery until 1995, when the submarine was discovered about 300 meters away from the Housatonic's resting place. Raised in 2000, the submarine is currently undergoing study and conservation in Charleston by a team of Clemson University scientists. Initially, the discovery of the submarine only seemed to deepen the mystery. The crewmen's skeletons were found still at their stations along a hand-crank that drove the cigar-shaped craft. They suffered no broken bones, the bilge pumps had not been used and the air hatches were closed. Except for a hole in one conning tower and a small window that may have been broken, the sub was remarkably intact. Speculation about their deaths has included suffocation and drowning. The new study involved repeatedly setting blasts near a scale model, shooting authentic weapons at historically accurate iron plate and calculating human respiration and the transmission of blast energy. The research was published in PLOS ONE. 



Breitbart News Wants Trump To Know His Base Is Not Happy About Afghanistan

Breitbart News Wants Trump To Know His Base Is Not Happy About AfghanistanBreitbart News had a clear message for President Donald Trump following his speech on the war in Afghanistan Monday night: His voter base is not happy.



Workers Shroud Charlottesville Robert E. Lee Statue in Black as City Mourns

Workers Shroud Charlottesville Robert E. Lee Statue in Black as City MournsThe city council voted to shroud the Lee statue



ExxonMobil: Oil and gas giant ?misled? the public about climate change, say Harvard experts

ExxonMobil: Oil and gas giant ?misled? the public about climate change, say Harvard expertsFossil fuel giant ExxonMobil ?misled the public? about the risks posed by climate change, an analysis of its public and private announcements on the subject by two Harvard University academics has concluded. While the company?s scientists and senior executive largely accepted the scientific consensus that global warming is real and poses significant risks, it spent thousands of dollars on regular advertorials in The New York Times (NYT) and other newspapers, in which it sought to cast doubt on the science. In some cases, the firm, led by the current US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, from 2006 to 2016, even contradicted itself.



What We Know About the U.S.'s New Nuclear Missile

What We Know About the U.S.'s New Nuclear MissileThe Ground Based Strategic Deterrent will replace the venerable Minuteman III ICBM, but does the Air Force even need it?