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All Building & Contractors
28000 West Jefferson Avenue
Rockwood , MI 48173
 
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(734) 692-1610
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Rental Management Services
19539 Wildwood Lane
Rockwood , MI 48173
 
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(734) 379-2222
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32409 Fort Road
Rockwood , MI 48173
 
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(734) 379-5323
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Dock Builders & Services
13333 Stork Street
Rockwood , MI 48173
 
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White House vows to continue funding Obamacare, averting showdown with Democrats

White House vows to continue funding Obamacare, averting showdown with DemocratsThe White House has assured Democrats it will continue to fund a key portion of Obamacare, clearing the way for negotiations on a series of spending bills to avoid a government shutdown, according to two sources familiar with the decision. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., had demanded that Congress pay for the Affordable Care Act?s subsidies ? which lower health care costs for 7 million people ? as part of the emerging spending bill.



Body of missing Joliet toddler found in mother's home

Body of missing Joliet toddler found in mother's homeJOLIET, Ill. (AP) ? The body of a 1½-year-old girl was found at a "deplorable" northern Illinois home that she and her mother shared with squatters after her mother reluctantly allowed detectives inside to search and a day after she reported her daughter missing, authorities said Thursday.



U.S. says strategy on North Korea centers on sanctions, open to talks

U.S. says strategy on North Korea centers on sanctions, open to talksBy Phil Stewart and David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration said on Wednesday it aimed to push North Korea into dismantling its nuclear and missile programs through tougher international sanctions and diplomatic pressure, and remained open to negotiations to bring that about. The U.S. stance, which appeared to signal a willingness to exhaust non-military avenues despite repeated warnings that "all options are on the table," came in a statement following an unusual White House-hosted briefing for the entire U.S. Senate followed by a briefing to the House of Representatives. Graphic - Carl Vinson strike group: http://tmsnrt.rs/2pqOMWA Graphic - North Korea's nuclear program: http://tmsnrt.rs/2n0gd92 The statement from Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats described North Korea as "an urgent national security threat and top foreign policy priority." North Korea's growing nuclear and missile threat is perhaps the most serious security challenge confronting President Donald Trump, who has vowed to prevent North Korea from being able to hit the United States with a nuclear missile - a capability experts say Pyongyang could have some time after 2020.



Sobering visualizations reveal how sea level rise could transform cities in your lifetime

Sobering visualizations reveal how sea level rise could transform cities in your lifetimeUntil recently, it seemed that we would be able to manage global warming-induced sea level rise through the end of the century. It would be problematic, of course, but manageable, particularly in industrialized nations like the U.S. However, troubling indications from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets show that melting is taking place faster than previously thought and that entire glaciers ? if not portions of the ice sheets themselves ? are destabilizing. This has scientists increasingly worried that the consensus sea level rise estimates are too conservative. With sea level rise, as with other climate impacts, the uncertainties tend to skew toward the more severe end of the scale. So, it's time to consider some worst-case scenarios. SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published an extreme high-end sea level rise scenario, showing 10 to 12 feet of sea level rise by 2100 around the U.S., compared to the previously published global average ? which is closer to 8 feet ? in that time period.  The research and journalism group Climate Central took this projection and plotted out the stark ramifications in painstaking, and  terrifying, detail.  The bottom line finding?  "By the end of the century, oceans could submerge land [that's] home to more than 12 million Americans and $2 trillion in property," according to Ben Strauss, who leads the sea level rise program at Climate Central.  Here's what major cities would look like with so much sea level rise: New York CityImage: CLIMATE CENTRAL New Orleans: Gone.Image: CLIMATE CENTRAL San Francisco International AirportImage: CLIMATE CENTRAL Bienvenido a Miami.Image: CLIMATE CENTRALIn an online report, Climate Central states that the impacts of such a high amount of sea level rise "would be devastating."  For example, Cape Canaveral, which is a crown jewel for NASA and now the private sector space industry, would be swallowed up by the Atlantic. Major universities, including MIT, would be underwater, as would President Trump's "southern White House" of Mar-a-Lago. In the West, San Francisco would be hard-hit, with San Francisco International Airport completely submerged. "More than 99 percent of today?s population in 252 coastal towns and cities would have their homes submerged, and property of more than half the population in 479 additional communities would also be underwater," the analysis, which has not been peer-reviewed, found.  Image: climate centralIn New York City, the average high tide would be a staggering 2 feet higher than the flood level experienced during Hurricane Sandy. More than 800,000 people would be flooded out of New York City alone.  Although the findings pertain to sea level rise through the end of the century, in reality sea levels would keep rising long after that, with a total increase of about 30 feet by 2200 for all coastal states, Climate Central found.  As for how likely this extreme scenario really is, here's what the report says:  "The extreme scenario is considered unlikely, but it is plausible. NOAA?s report and Antarctic research suggest that deep and rapid cuts to heat-trapping pollution would greatly reduce its chances."  More specifically, the NOAA projection says this high-end outlook has just a 0.1 percent chance of occurring under a scenario in which we keep emitting greenhouse gases at about the current rate. While a 1-in-1,000 chance outcome might seem nearly impossible to occur, recent events suggest otherwise.  For example, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the Mid-Atlantic in 2012 while following a track that was virtually unprecedented in storm history. In addition, California is estimated to have had just a 1 percent chance of climbing out of its deep drought in a one to two-year period, and it did just that this winter.  Also, Donald Trump is president, people.  Robert Kopp, a sea level rise researcher at Rutgers University, whose projections formed the basis of the NOAA scenarios, said it's difficult to put exact odds on the extreme scenario.  "I would say that our knowledge about marine ice-sheet instability is too deeply uncertain for us to answer that question right now," Kopp said in an email. "We can come up with a physically plausible pathway that gets us to 2.5 meters [or 8.2 feet], we know it is more likely under higher emissions, but we don't have a good way of putting a probability on it." A paper published in the journal Nature in March found that if emissions of global warming pollutants peak in the next few years and are then reduced quickly thereafter, then there is a good chance that the melting of the Antarctic Ice Sheet would be drastically curtailed.  However, with the U.S., which is the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, backing away from making significant cuts under the Paris Climate Agreement, adhering to such an ambitious timetable is looking less realistic.  Image: climate centralIn order for NOAA's extreme scenario, and therefore Climate Central's maps, to turn into reality, there would need to be decades more of sustained high emissions of greenhouse gases plus more melting from Antarctica than is currently anticipated.  However, recent studies have raised questions about Antarctica's stability, as mild ocean waters eat away at floating ice shelves from below, freeing up glaciers well inland to flow faster into the sea.  "What's new is that we used to think 6- to 7 feet was the max *plausible* or *possible* sea level rise this century, and now we've roughly doubled that," Strauss said in an email. "The new Antarctic science says it's plausible."  "If you were to survey ice sheet experts today, instead of something like 5 to 10 years ago, I suspect you'd get a significantly higher probability than 0.1 percent," he said.  A study published in the journal Nature Climate Change last week found that sea level rise could prompt a wave of internal migration within the U.S., especially as people move from the hardest-hit states such as Florida, Louisiana and New York. It's long been known that Florida is ground zero for sea level rise impacts, but the Climate Central projections are even more pessimistic. The report shows that a whopping 5.6 million Floridians would be at risk before the end of the century under an extreme sea level rise scenario, about double the amount simulated in the study last week. WATCH: Serene underwater footage shows whale's-eye view of Antarctica



2 US soldiers killed fighting Isis in Afghanistan region hit by 'mother of all bombs'

2 US soldiers killed fighting Isis in Afghanistan region hit by 'mother of all bombs'Pentagon spokesman Captain Jeff Davis said that the US personnel were killed overnight in the Nangarhar province, on the border with Pakistan. Pentagon spokesman Adam Stump confirmed to The Independent that the soldiers were killed while fighting Isis-Khorosan, the local affiliate of the terror group. This is the "same general area" - southern Nangarhar province - where the massive ordnance air blast, dubbed the "mother of all bombs" (MOAB) was dropped earlier this month, Mr Stump said.



Battling ISIS in Hatra, Iraq, and more: April 26 in photos

Battling ISIS in Hatra, Iraq, and more: April 26 in photosIraqi paramilitary troops fire toward Islamic State militants during a battle on the outskirts of the ancient city of Hatra, near Mosul, Iraq; the robes of Pope Francis are blown over his head by a gust of wind as he delivers his homily during the weekly audience in St. Peter?s Square in Vatican City; and demonstrators in Minsk, Belarus, mark the 31st anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster.



Arkansas set to carry out final execution before drug expires

Arkansas set to carry out final execution before drug expiresArkansas was set to execute another inmate on Thursday, the last in a series of lethal injections that the state has squeezed into a compressed timeline, even as the daughter of one of his victims appealed for clemency. Four of the inmates won reprieves, but the state carried out its first execution since 2005 last Thursday, putting convicted murderer Ledell Lee to death at its Cummins Unit, near Varner, Arksansas. Jack Jones and Marcel Williams, convicted separately of rape and murder in the 1990s, were executed on Monday in the nation's first double execution in nearly 17 years.



Fox News hit with racism lawsuit alleging 'plantation-style management' for black employees

Fox News hit with racism lawsuit alleging 'plantation-style management' for black employeesWeeks after firing host Bill O?Reilly amid allegations of sexual harassment, Fox News is under fire once again for accusations of racial discrimination. Eleven current and former Fox News employees have filed a lawsuit alleging that Fox employees engaged in ?abhorrent, intolerable, unlawful and hostile racial discrimination? and created a workplace ?more akin to Plantation-style management than a modern-day work environment". The case, which started with two former payroll employees, made headlines this week with the addition of former Fox and Friends co-host Kelly Williams.



AT&T to Roll Out 5G Network That's Not Actually 5G

AT&T to Roll Out 5G Network That's Not Actually 5GAT&T is using some wordsmithing to deliver to you faster Internet speeds. This week, the wireless carrier announced plans to deliver what it's calling the "5G Evolution" network to more than 20 markets by the end of the year. Credit: Jeremy Lips/Tom's GuideFor starters, to call AT&T's move a 5G rollout would be a bad idea.



US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian GulfDUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) ? A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer fired a warning flare toward an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel coming near it in the Persian Gulf, an American official said on Wednesday, the latest tense naval encounter between the two countries.