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1924 Ky Highway 330 West
Falmouth , KY 41040
 
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2556 Ky Highway 159 North
Falmouth , KY 41040
 
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Pet Grooming & Boarding
801 West Shelby Street
Falmouth , KY 41040
 
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Trump reacts to Barcelona terror by touting (debunked) anti-Muslim war crime tale

Trump reacts to Barcelona terror by touting (debunked) anti-Muslim war crime talePresident Trump responded to the news of a terrorist attack in Spain by peddling a debunked legend about a general?s harsh tactics more than a century ago.



Two People in Custody in Connection With Barcelona Attack

Two People in Custody in Connection With Barcelona AttackAuthorities say neither of them was the driver in the vehicle attack, which killed more than a dozen people in the famous Las Ramblas area.



Does the Radical Left Pose a Violent Threat?

Does the Radical Left Pose a Violent Threat?The FBI tracks both the radical left and right, but warns that it's white supremacist extremists who pose a greater threat of violence.



59 Crazy Creative Things To Make With Cauliflower

59 Crazy Creative Things To Make With Cauliflower

You'll never look at it the same way again.

From Delish



Maryland judge denies DC sniper Malvo's bid for new sentence

Maryland judge denies DC sniper Malvo's bid for new sentenceLee Boyd Malvo, who as a teenager participated in the sniper attacks that killed 10 people and terrorized the Washington region, will not get a new sentence in Maryland, a judge said in a ruling released Wednesday.



10-Year-Old Indian Rape Victim Delivers Baby After Denied Abortion

10-Year-Old Indian Rape Victim Delivers Baby After Denied Abortion"The child is too young for a normal delivery. Her pelvic bones are not strong enough to push the baby and she does not have the stamina to bear labor pain."



U.S. Navy to remove senior leaders of warship after deadly June crash

U.S. Navy to remove senior leaders of warship after deadly June crashBy Idrees Ali WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Navy will relieve the two senior officers and the senior enlisted sailor on a U.S. warship that collided with a Philippine container ship in June off the coast of Japan, the Navy said on Thursday, A separate official report released on Thursday contained dramatic accounts of what happened when the freighter hit the USS Fitzgerald, killing seven Navy sailors. Admiral Bill Moran, deputy chief of naval operations, told reporters that the USS Fitzgerald's commander, executive officer and master chief petty officer would be removed. Multiple U.S. and Japanese investigations are still under way into how the Fitzgerald, a guided missile destroyer, and the much larger ACX Crystal container ship collided in clear weather south of Tokyo Bay in the early hours of June 17.



Did outing Charlottesville's white supremacists just make them more committed?

Did outing Charlottesville's white supremacists just make them more committed?The ?Unite the Right? rally on Saturday morning in Charlottesville, Virginia, was the first time 27-year-old Nigel Krofta attended a white nationalist event. He?s been active in the movement online, but last weekend he stepped out from behind his keyboard and stood clutching a billy club alongside the neo-Nazis, white nationalists, Klansmen, and other so-called alt-right marchers.  That day, Krofta met James Alex Fields Jr., who allegedly drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters just a few hours later, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others. After the bloodshed, a photo of the two men, published by the New York Times, found its way to Twitter, where Krofta was identified by name?along with his hometown and the contact information for his employer. He was labeled an ?area Nazi? by a journalist in Charleston, South Carolina, not far from Krofta?s home in Ridgeville. SEE ALSO: How you can take action against white supremacy after Charlottesville On Monday, Krofta said he started to receive threats. He was also promptly fired from his job as a welder. ?My employer was being called with threats on their business and persons and they responded by discharging me,? the now-former metalworker told Mashable. ?My actions and beliefs are mine and I do not want anyone to be hurt or harmed for being associated with me.? I talked to the Ridgeville man, also a white supremacist, shown next to accused murderer James Fields at rally. https://t.co/YKv5zUWscY ? Michael Majchrowicz (@mjmajchrowicz) August 14, 2017 For online activists seeking to identify the marchers at Saturday?s rally, this seems like mission accomplished: A participant faced real-world consequences, outside the confines of the white nationalist movement, where having Nazi sympathies makes you a pariah. But, while activists hope the threat of shame (and unemployment) will deter racists from joining future marches, their actions could have unintended consequences: pushing neo-Nazis out of the shadows could just force them to double down.Krofta is one of multiple marchers outed by online activists: In California, Cole White reportedly resigned from his job at a hotdog restaurant after his bosses caught wind of his involvement in Charlottesville over the weekend. In Nevada, 20-year-old University of Nevada at Reno student Peter Cvjetanovic got so much publicity he went on a local news program to explain that he is ?not the angry racist they see in that photo.? The photo to which he?s referring shows Cvjetanovic?and his Hitler-esque hairstyle?carrying a torch and screeching alongside other white nationalists the night before Saturday?s deadly rally. In Fargo, North Dakota, the shame of seeing his son marching with known bigots prompted a father to pen a lengthy op-ed for a local newspaper essentially disowning his racist son. ?I, along with all of his siblings and his entire family, wish to loudly repudiate my son?s vile, hateful and racist rhetoric and actions,? he wrote. UPDATE: Cole White, the first person I exposed, no longer has a job ???? #GoodNightColeWhite #ExposeTheAltRight #Charlottesville pic.twitter.com/sqxSXboKw6 ? Yes, You're Racist (@YesYoureRacist) August 13, 2017 The outing of racists has been met with fanfare. The Twitter page @YesYoureARacist, dedicated to shining a light on bigoted behavior, had 60,000 followers on Saturday morning?now, it has 400,000. Identifying racists has been the goal of civil rights organizations for years, with the idea that it will create problems for them in their personal and professional lives. As Southern Poverty Law Center researcher Ryan Lenz says in the documentary Welcome to Leith about the attempted neo-Nazi takeover of a small North Dakota town, ?If you wanna be a Nazi, you can be a Nazi. But I?m gonna make sure the world knows you?re a Nazi.?Logan Smith, who founded the YesYoureARacist feed, put it similarly: "Ever since the days of the KKK burning crosses in people's yards, they depend on people remaining silent," Smith told NPR.  "And no matter the risk, I'm not going away." White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" march toward Emancipation Park in CharlottesvilleImage: Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesYet, there?s a problem. In a world where the President of the United States says there were ?very fine people? on ?both sides? of Saturday?s rally, people might not care whether people know they?re aligned with white supremacists, according to several demonstrators at the rally who railed against Jews, ?faggots," and other groups. In fact, according to some, being exposed is only emboldening a movement they feel has essentially been endorsed by the president of the United States. ?All we're doing is massively, massively growing,? David Duke, the infamous former Ku Klux Klan leader who was at the rally in Charlottesville, told Mashable. Donald Trump mentioned Duke by name during a press conference on Tuesday where he defended the ?good people? on the right who demonstrated in Charlottesville. Duke made headlines during last year?s presidential election when he endorsed Trump. It took the president nearly a week to disavow the endorsement of a notorious white supremacist?who is perhaps the most well-known white supremacist of the last 30 years and whom Trump initially claimed to know nothing about. ?I?ve gotten 15 million Twitter impressions [since the rally in Charlottesville] and 90 percent have been positive,? Duke continued, adding that, ?the Antifa [anti-fascist activists] might think they?re making some gains on us [by outing white nationalists] but they're not...people see through it now. They see what?s going on. They have the Internet. They saw what happened [in Charlottesville]. We weren't there for violence. We were there to make our point.?For white nationalists, Duke's mission was accomplished. Those I spoke with expressed few regrets about what happened in Charlottesville, though many claimed to not support violence. (This claim is belied by the events, which left one woman dead and dozens wounded. The governor of Virginia described the white nationalists as more heavily armed than the police.)  Outing a guy like Duke, or Richard Spencer?the de-facto leader of the ?alt-right? movement?is pointless; their names are synonymous with white supremacy and a simple Google search will reveal who they are. But for people like Nigel Krofta, who stepped into the world of white nationalism and ended up unemployed and publicly dubbed a Nazi, the consequences could be more severe.Krofta, at least, doesn?t care. In fact, he says, it?s only strengthened his resolve. Asked if he considered the potential consequences of demonstrating with a group of white nationalists before Saturday, Krofta said, ?Of course I did. However, it was a risk I was willing to take and I have no regrets.?Krofta said his experience in Charlottesville?and the fallout from his activities?has only encouraged him to do more. He said he plans on joining a formal white nationalist group and to continue attending rallies. For the next one, he said, he and his ?alt-right? cronies will be ?better prepared.??I feel vindicated,? he said. ?[Getting exposed] strengthened my resolve.? He added, ?I have my own plans...I hope I do inspire more to be more active.? White nationalist demonstrators surrounded by counter demonstrators in Charlottesville.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockThe gloating and positive spin on what happened in Charlottesville is not unexpected, says Oren Segal, director of the Anti-Defamation League?s Center on Extremism, who tracks white nationalist groups like the ?alt-right? and the National Socialist Movement, the country?s primary neo-Nazi organization.?Duke, Spencer and others will surely try to leverage this moment to double-down on their fantasies of creating a white civil rights movement,? Segal said. He added, ?Generally, the people who show up to rallies have already taken the leap [into unabashed white nationalism]...there are some unintended consequences to [publicly name them] that can backfire. White supremacists generally don?t miss an opportunity to portray themselves as the victims.?That?s exactly what happened. People like Duke and Spencer have spent the last few days playing the victim on social media and beyond. President Trump appears to be paying attention to the plight of the poor white nationalists, as evidenced by that insane press conference on Tuesday, in which Trump repeatedly emphasized that both sides had done wrong.Krofta also doesn?t have much faith in the identification tactics of the ?alt-right?s? opposition in terms of keeping people from upcoming rallies. While he concedes that people may be ?afraid to show [once they] realize that all it takes is one photo to ruin their life,? he?s quick to add that he doesn?t fall into that camp. ?My life has not been ruined,? he said.Efforts to identify participants could still deter some. On Aug. 19, a group of ?free speech activists? with tentacles in the ?alt-right? sphere are planning a rally in Boston. After the chaos in Virginia, speakers began to pull out of the event in fear of being publicly linked to the ?alt-right.? The group has publicly disavowed the rally in Charlottesville and insists that their organization is in no way affiliated with people like Duke or Spencer. But the rally is still a target for Antifa activists, who believe it?s an extension of what happened in Charlottesville. "Yes, there is concern of doxxing and spreading of false information about people to cost them their careers," an unidentified administrator of the group?s Facebook page said. ?In fact, one of our members lost his job due to this defamation already.? The rally in Boston is scheduled to go forth as of this writing, despite rumors that it had been canceled.For Krofta, his new-found infamy has only pushed him further into the world of white nationalism. As for his new buddy, alleged killer James Fields Jr., Krofta said he doesn?t think his actions were premeditated. But he declined to condemn the alleged murder. Rather, Krofta excused it.?I think people have to understand that the protesters had every street blocked and we were surrounded,? he said. ?They also had the parking garage blocked and surrounded. [He] was most likely looking for a way out of there.?He added, ?[Fields] did not have any plans to [slam his car through a crowd of people] to my knowledge...that is a very expensive car.? If you?re looking for direct ways to take action after the Charlottesville violence, we?ve identified five things you can do right now .



Second vehicle attack: five terror suspects 'wearing suicide vests' shot dead in Cambrils

Second vehicle attack: five terror suspects 'wearing suicide vests' shot dead in CambrilsResidents of the Spanish seaside resort of Cambrils fled in terror in the early hours of Friday after five terrorists wearing suicide vests launched the second ramming attack in the country in a matter of hours.  At least six people were hurt when the attackers drove into pedestrians before being shot dead by security forces, just hours after a similar attack in nearby Barcelona. The Audi A3 car rammed into people on the seaside promenade of the tourist city 74 miles south of Barcelona, where a van had earlier sped into a street packed full of tourists, killing 13 people and injuring around 100 others. Police said the suspects in Cambrils carried bomb belts, which were detonated by a police bomb squad. Barcelona terror attack, in pictures Media reports said a car crashed into a police vehicle and nearby civilians and police shot the attackers, one brandishing a knife. Police did not immediately say how the attack was being carried out. A police officer and five civilians were injured and two were in serious condition. Police were working on the theory that the Cambrils and Barcelona attacks were  connected, as well as a Wednesday night explosion in the town of Alcanar in which one person was killed.. "The alleged terrorists were in an Audi A3 and apparently knocked down several people before coming across a police patrol and a shoot-out ensued," said a spokesman for the regional government of Catalonia, where Cambrils is located in Spain's northeast. Spanish Policemen inspect a street in Cambrils  Credit: EPA Markel Artabe, a 20-year-old restaurant worker, said he was on the seaside promenade when he heard what he initially thought were fireworks, but soon realised were gunshots. He said he saw someone lying on the ground "with a gunshot in the head". The victim's friends were crying out "help", he added. Joan Marc Serra Salinas, a 21-year-old waiter, said he heard many gunshots. "And shouting. And more shouting. I jumped onto the beach and didn't move," he said. Police said they were "working on the hypothesis that the terrorists shot dead in Cambrils could be linked to what happened in Barcelona". How the Barcelona terror attack unfolded 01:10 The attack in Cambrils happened as security forces hunted for the driver of the van used in the Barcelona rampage, who was seen escaping on foot.  Police announced the arrest of two suspects over the Barcelona attack, identified as a Spaniard and a Moroccan, but said the driver was still on the run. "We're united in grief," Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said in a televised address after rushing to Barcelona. "Above all we're united in the firm intention to defeat those who want to take our values and way of life from us."



Prominent investigator exits Mueller team

Prominent investigator exits Mueller teamRachel Maddow reports on the surprising departure of Peter Strzok, a prominent counter-espionage investigator who had been working on Robert Mueller's Trump Russia investigation.